Tuning and spontaneous spike time synchrony share a common structure in macaque inferior temporal cortex

By May 21, 2014

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Chia-pei Lin Chou P. Hung
J Neurophysiology Acute Monkey Taiwanese Macaque Cortex LFP Penetrating Electrode|Primate Electrode A8x8-5mm200-200-413

Investigating the relationship between tuning and spike timing is necessary to understand how neuronal populations in anterior visual cortex process complex stimuli. Are tuning and spontaneous spike time synchrony linked by a common spatial structure (do some cells co- vary more strongly, even in the absence of visual stimulation?), and what is the object coding capability of this structure? Here, we recorded from spiking populations in macaque inferior temporal (IT) cortex under neurolept anesthesia. We report that although most nearby IT neurons are weakly correlated, neurons with more similar tuning are also more synchronized during spontaneous activity. This link between tuning and synchrony was not simply due to cell separation distance. Instead, it expands on previous reports that neurons along an IT penetration are tuned to similar but slightly different features. This constraint on possible population firing rate patterns was consistent across stimulus sets, including animate versus inanimate object categories. A classifier trained on this structure was able to generalize category ‘read-out’ to untrained objects using only a few dimensions (a few patterns of site weightings per electrode array). We suggest that tuning and spike synchrony are linked by a common spatial structure that is highly efficient for object representation.

Lin C-p et al, Tuning and spontaneous spike time synchrony share a common structure in macaque inferior temporal cortex. J Neurophysiol. DOI 10.1152/jn.00485.2013

http://jn.physiology.org/content/early/2014/05/16/jn.00485.2013 May 21, 2014 National Yang-Ming University